Posts Tagged ‘what is privacy’

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More Demands on Cell Carriers

July 13, 2012

In the first public accounting of its kind, cellphone carriers reported that they responded to a startling 1.3 million demands for subscriber information last year from law enforcement agencies seeking text messages, caller locations and other information in the course of investigations.

The cellphone carriers’ reports, which come in response to a Congressional inquiry, document an explosion in cellphone surveillance in the last five years, with the companies turning over records thousands of times a day in response to police emergencies, court orders, law enforcement subpoenas and other requests.

While the cell companies did not break down the types of law enforcement agencies collecting the data, they made clear that the widened cell surveillance cut across all levels of government — from run-of-the-mill street crimes handled by local police departments to financial crimes and intelligence investigations at the state and federal levels.

AT&T alone now responds to an average of more than 700 requests a day, with about 230 of them regarded as emergencies that do not require the normal court orders and subpoena. That is roughly triple the number it fielded in 2007, the company said. Law enforcement requests of all kinds have been rising among the other carriers as well, with annual increases of between 12 percent and 16 percent in the last five years. Sprint, which did not break down its figures in as much detail as other carriers, led all companies last year in reporting what amounted to at least 1,500 data requests on average a day.

With the rapid expansion of cell surveillance have come rising concerns — including among carriers — about what legal safeguards are in place to balance law enforcement agencies’ needs for quick data against the privacy rights of consumers.  Source

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Cloud Computing: Managing File Transfers in the Cloud: 10 Points to Demystify the Process

May 14, 2012

Managed file transfer is a well-accepted way for organizations to share business files point-to-point, quickly, reliably and securely. This is a subject that requires attention, especially when it comes to thorny issues, such as enterprise security and compliance. MFT uses different types of applications to securely transfer data from one computer to another. This small but important area of IT management earned attention in recent years after IBM bought Sterling Commerce for more than a $1 billion, and MFT specialist Ipswitch merged with Message Way. Over the years, despite having lost a bit of its novel cachet, MFT is as effective as ever. But now, due to greater demands for the secure transfer of data through cloud systems, MFT is being refreshed as it morphs and expands to play a critical role in moving large data sets (the so-called big data)—as well as traditional business files—through the cloud. Here, eWEEK offers some key data points about MFT, the cloud, and big data. Our expert source is Robert Fox, director of B2B/EAI Software Development at Liaison Technologies in Alpharetta, Ga. Liaison Technologies cleanses and validates business data for master data management purposes and securely integrates and manages complex business information on-premise or in the cloud. Read More

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Google wants to serve you ads based on the background noise of your phone calls

March 23, 2012

Just when you think that we’re pretty tech savvy, companies like Google and Nokia file outlandish “forward-thinking” patents that make you feel like we’re all in a Star Trek episode. In the case of Google’s latest patent, it makes us feel like we’re in a police state.

The patent discusses the technology to analyze the background noise during your phone call and serve up ads for you based on the environmental conditions Google picks up on.

 

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Reading Over Your Shoulder: Social Readers and Privacy Law

March 19, 2012

Margot Kaminski has an article in Wake Forest Law Review. Online that begins:

My friends, who are generally well educated and intelligent, read a lot of garbage. I know this because since September 2011, their taste in news about Justin Bieber, Snooki, and the Kardashians has been shared with me through “social readers” on Facebook.[1] Social readers instantaneously list what you are reading on another website, without asking for your approval before disclosing each individual article you read. They are an example of what Facebook calls “frictionless sharing,” where Facebook users ostensibly influence each other’s behavior by making their consumption of content on other websites instantly visible to their friends.[2] Many people do not think twice about using these applications, and numerous publications have made them available, including the Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, and Guardian.[3]

Footnotes

  1. See, e.g., Ian Paul, Wall Street Journal Social on Facebook: A First Look, Today @PCWorld Blog (Sep. 20, 2011, 7:02 AM), http://www.pcworld.com/article/240274/wall_street_journal_social_on_facebook
    _a_first_look.html.
  2. Jason Gilbert, Facebook Frictionless App Frenzy Will Make Your Life More Open, Huffington Post (Jan. 18, 2012), http://www.huffingtonpost.com
    /2012/01/18/facebook‑actions‑arrive‑major‑changes_n_1213183.html.
  3. See The Washington Post Social Reader, Wash. Post, http://www.washingtonpost.com/socialreader (last visited Feb. 26, 2012); Press Release, The Guardian, Guardian Announces New App on Facebook to Make News More Social (Sept, 23, 2011), available at http://www.guardian.co.uk/gnm
    -press-office/guardian-launches-facebook-app; Paul, supra note 1.
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Health Officials Seeking More Secure Mobile Devices

March 14, 2012

Mobile devices, from smartphones to tablet computers, are increasingly used in hospitals and other health care settings. But regulators fear that manufacturers have not taken adequate steps to safeguard privacy and security with the technology.

To help seal those gaps, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) has launched the Privacy & Security Mobile Device project. The initiative will be managed by the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology’s (ONC) Office of the Chief Privacy Officer and the HHS Office for Civil Rights.

The project also will work to develop case studies to help communicate to health care providers how to secure and protect health information when using mobile devices. An example of a provider use case scenario is the health care provider who is at home and on call, using a laptop to read a patient’s electronic medical record.

“The rationale behind this specific project is that the use of mobile devices in health care has skyrocketed in the last year,” said Joy Pritts, JD, chief privacy officer for ONC, in an interview. “The concern is that health information is some of the most sensitive information that there is.”

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Facebook Profiles Accurately Predict Job Performance [STUDY]Facebook Profiles Accurately Predict Job Performance [STUDY]

February 22, 2012

Do you want to know how that applicant you just interviewed will actually perform on the job? Check out her Facebookprofile.

That’s the advice of a new study from the Northern Illinois University, the University of Evansville and Auburn University. The researchers recruited a group of four Facebook-savvy human resources professionals and students to evaluate the Facebook profiles of 56 users. The four perused each of the profiles for about 10 minutes each before grading them according to the so-called Big Five personality traits (openness, conscientiousness, extraversion, agreeableness and neuroticism).

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Cyber experts show vulnerability of GSM networks

February 21, 2012

A group of cyber experts stunned a conference here when they showed the vulnerability of GSM mobile networks which can be easily exploited by hackers enabling them to impersonate a user’s identity and make calls from his account without a clue to the consumer.

The ethical group — matrix shell — gave a demonstration of the hacker’s technique on a live network of a leading mobile service provider in which they managed to make a call using the number of a audience member without actually using his phone or SIM.