Posts Tagged ‘Google’

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Google wants to serve you ads based on the background noise of your phone calls

March 23, 2012

Just when you think that we’re pretty tech savvy, companies like Google and Nokia file outlandish “forward-thinking” patents that make you feel like we’re all in a Star Trek episode. In the case of Google’s latest patent, it makes us feel like we’re in a police state.

The patent discusses the technology to analyze the background noise during your phone call and serve up ads for you based on the environmental conditions Google picks up on.

 

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Google offering to pay web users to track their every move

February 14, 2012

Less than a month after announcing a controversial new privacy policy that shares user data across all its sites with no opt-out option, Google is introducing a system to monitor all online activity of those who participate in a program called Screenwise.

In exchange for unrestricted access to information on your every online move, the search and software giant is offering financial compensation.

Do you want to sell your privacy?

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Google announces upcoming changes that affect your privacy

January 30, 2012

The main change is for users with Google Accounts. Their new Privacy Policy makes clear that, if you’re signed in, they may combine information you’ve provided from one service with information from other services. In short, they’ll treat you as a single user across all our products, which will mean a simpler, more intuitive Google experience.

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Twitter lashes out at Google search changes

January 16, 2012

Google launched a social network in June, dubbed Google+, that offers many of the capabilities available on Twitter and on Facebook.

With Tuesday’s changes to Google’s search engine, photos and posts from Google+ will increasingly appear within the search results.

The changes effectively create customized search results for people who are logged in to Google. A person who searches for the term “Hawaii,” for example, might find private photos that their friends have shared on Google+ as well as public information about the islands.

Twitter’s general counsel, Alex Macgillivray, a former Google attorney, said in a Tweet on Tuesday that Google’s changes “warped” Web searches and represented a “bad day for the Internet.”

Source Twitter lashes out at Google search changes

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India Govt plans rule for encrypted data access

January 13, 2012

Service providers will have to place servers in India to ensure data is not leaked out of country

The India government has proposed a legal provision that puts the onus uniformly on companies such as Skype Technologies SA and Google Inc​. to locate part of their information technology (IT) infrastructure within the country to enable investigative agencies ready access to encrypted data on their servers.

Further, to guarantee privacy, this legal provision will also require that data of Indian citizens, government organizations and firms hosted on the servers of these companies not be moved out of the country, three government officials confirmed separately.

At present, the servers of all service providers are located outside the country and whatever data is generated or exchanged travels to the respective country. If servers or similar facilities are located in India, then data exchanges within the country would stay there.

Source  India Govt plans rule for encrypted data access

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December 23, 2011
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On Its Own, Europe Backs Web Privacy Fights

September 7, 2011

All 90 people wanted information deleted from the Web.

Marta Ramoneda for The New York Times

Fernando Pérez, publisher of a Spanish government publication, said that “maybe there is information that has a life cycle.”

Among them was a victim of domestic violence who discovered that her address could easily be found through Google. Another, well into middle age now, thought it was unfair that a few computer key strokes could unearth an account of her arrest in her college days.

They might not have received much of a hearing in the United States, where Google is based. But here, as elsewhere in Europe, an idea has taken hold —individuals should have a “right to be forgotten” on the Web.

Spain’s government is now championing this cause. It has ordered Google to stop indexing information about 90 citizens who filed formal complaints with its Data Protection Agency.

Source On Its Own, Europe Backs Web Privacy Fights