Posts Tagged ‘Computer security’

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Cloud Computing: Managing File Transfers in the Cloud: 10 Points to Demystify the Process

May 14, 2012

Managed file transfer is a well-accepted way for organizations to share business files point-to-point, quickly, reliably and securely. This is a subject that requires attention, especially when it comes to thorny issues, such as enterprise security and compliance. MFT uses different types of applications to securely transfer data from one computer to another. This small but important area of IT management earned attention in recent years after IBM bought Sterling Commerce for more than a $1 billion, and MFT specialist Ipswitch merged with Message Way. Over the years, despite having lost a bit of its novel cachet, MFT is as effective as ever. But now, due to greater demands for the secure transfer of data through cloud systems, MFT is being refreshed as it morphs and expands to play a critical role in moving large data sets (the so-called big data)—as well as traditional business files—through the cloud. Here, eWEEK offers some key data points about MFT, the cloud, and big data. Our expert source is Robert Fox, director of B2B/EAI Software Development at Liaison Technologies in Alpharetta, Ga. Liaison Technologies cleanses and validates business data for master data management purposes and securely integrates and manages complex business information on-premise or in the cloud. Read More

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Google Drive Wants a Piece of the File Sharing and Storage Pie – But It Might Not Taste So Sweet for Businesses

May 1, 2012

This week Google announced its newest offering, Google Drive. The launch of Google Drive, a cloud-based file storage and synchronization tool, places Google’s hat in the ring with other file sharing services. In response, Vice President of Sales and Client Services at FilesAnywhere, Shayne Mehringer, gave this statement:

“Google is king when it comes to Internet searching, and websites around the world count on them for outstanding targeted advertising abilities. However, this doesn’t necessarily make them right for the business and consumer file storage market. Oversaturation in the online storage and collaboration market is actually a good thing for us. Smart, professional consumers and corporations will now be forced to do their homework. Source 

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Apple holds the master decryption key when it comes to iCloud security, privacy

April 5, 2012

Apple can potentially decrypt and access all data stored on iCloud servers. This includes contacts, notes, unencrypted e-mails, application preferences, Safari bookmarks, calendars, and reminders.

This was recently confirmed by a source speaking to Ars, and security researcher and forensic data analysis expert Jonathan Zdziarski agreed. “I can tell you that the iCloud terms and conditions are pretty telling about what the capabilities are at Apple with respect to iCloud, and suggests they can view any and all content,” Zdziarski told Ars.

In particular, Zdziarski cited particular clauses of iCloud Terms and Conditions that state that Apple can “pre-screen, move, refuse, modify and/or remove Content at any time” if the content is deemed “objectionable” or otherwise in violation of the terms of service. Furthermore, Apple can “access, use, preserve and/or disclose your Account information and Content to law enforcement authorities” whenever required or permitted by law. Apple further says that it will review content reportedly in violation of copyright under DMCA statutes.

“If iCloud data was fully encrypted, they wouldn’t be able to review content, provide content to law enforcement, or attempt to identify DMCA violations,” Zdziarski told Ars.

Source

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New EU Data Laws: Cloud Brings Increased Risk Of Massive Fines

April 4, 2012

That was the warning delivered by Vinod Bange, a top London-based IT lawyer, as the EU proposes new laws to penalise data breaches.

Bange said: “Regulatory sanctions have gone way off the scale in terms of what we are used to right now. The sting in the tail, which did not exist before, is that there is a provision to calculate a fine that is based on a percentage of annual global turnover. That’s big news and a big change.

“Organisations have moved on so much since the original legislation in 1995. In this globalised, outsourced, social media, cloud driven environment, you could end up with a third tier fine.”

The EU is proposing three tiers of fines, the first of which runs up to £209,000 or 0.5 per cent of turnover, the second up to £418,000 or 1 per cent of turnover. The top tier allows for a fine of up to £837,000 or 2 per cent of turnover.

The latter could be a potentially massive fine to the tune of hundreds of millions, with tier three penalties relating to international data transfers. Businesses using the cloud, and data centres across the globe, could be more vulnerable to this massive whack of a fine.

Currently, the ICO’s maximum imposition for those who aren’t careful with their data is a £500,000 penalty.

Source: Computerworld

Read more: http://www.itproportal.com/2012/04/02/new-eu-data-laws-cloud-brings-increased-risk-of-massive-fines/#ixzz1r2Ox2ptx

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Google wants to serve you ads based on the background noise of your phone calls

March 23, 2012

Just when you think that we’re pretty tech savvy, companies like Google and Nokia file outlandish “forward-thinking” patents that make you feel like we’re all in a Star Trek episode. In the case of Google’s latest patent, it makes us feel like we’re in a police state.

The patent discusses the technology to analyze the background noise during your phone call and serve up ads for you based on the environmental conditions Google picks up on.

 

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Reading Over Your Shoulder: Social Readers and Privacy Law

March 19, 2012

Margot Kaminski has an article in Wake Forest Law Review. Online that begins:

My friends, who are generally well educated and intelligent, read a lot of garbage. I know this because since September 2011, their taste in news about Justin Bieber, Snooki, and the Kardashians has been shared with me through “social readers” on Facebook.[1] Social readers instantaneously list what you are reading on another website, without asking for your approval before disclosing each individual article you read. They are an example of what Facebook calls “frictionless sharing,” where Facebook users ostensibly influence each other’s behavior by making their consumption of content on other websites instantly visible to their friends.[2] Many people do not think twice about using these applications, and numerous publications have made them available, including the Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, and Guardian.[3]

Footnotes

  1. See, e.g., Ian Paul, Wall Street Journal Social on Facebook: A First Look, Today @PCWorld Blog (Sep. 20, 2011, 7:02 AM), http://www.pcworld.com/article/240274/wall_street_journal_social_on_facebook
    _a_first_look.html.
  2. Jason Gilbert, Facebook Frictionless App Frenzy Will Make Your Life More Open, Huffington Post (Jan. 18, 2012), http://www.huffingtonpost.com
    /2012/01/18/facebook‑actions‑arrive‑major‑changes_n_1213183.html.
  3. See The Washington Post Social Reader, Wash. Post, http://www.washingtonpost.com/socialreader (last visited Feb. 26, 2012); Press Release, The Guardian, Guardian Announces New App on Facebook to Make News More Social (Sept, 23, 2011), available at http://www.guardian.co.uk/gnm
    -press-office/guardian-launches-facebook-app; Paul, supra note 1.
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Health Officials Seeking More Secure Mobile Devices

March 14, 2012

Mobile devices, from smartphones to tablet computers, are increasingly used in hospitals and other health care settings. But regulators fear that manufacturers have not taken adequate steps to safeguard privacy and security with the technology.

To help seal those gaps, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) has launched the Privacy & Security Mobile Device project. The initiative will be managed by the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology’s (ONC) Office of the Chief Privacy Officer and the HHS Office for Civil Rights.

The project also will work to develop case studies to help communicate to health care providers how to secure and protect health information when using mobile devices. An example of a provider use case scenario is the health care provider who is at home and on call, using a laptop to read a patient’s electronic medical record.

“The rationale behind this specific project is that the use of mobile devices in health care has skyrocketed in the last year,” said Joy Pritts, JD, chief privacy officer for ONC, in an interview. “The concern is that health information is some of the most sensitive information that there is.”