Archive for the ‘Networking’ Category

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The 9 Faces of Leadership

April 1, 2012

According to FedEx, its best leaders share nine personal attributes – which the company defines with remarkable specificity. FedEx also has a system for rating aspiring leaders on whether they possess these attributes. How do you rate? Judge yourself against these edited descriptions of the nine faces of leadership at FedEx.

Charisma

Instills faith, respect, and trust. Has a special gift of seeing what others need to consider. Conveys a strong sense of mission.

Individual consideration

Coaches, advises, and teaches people who need it. Actively listens and gives indications of listening. Gives newcomers a lot of help.

Intellectual stimulation

Gets others to use reasoning and evidence, rather than unsupported opinion. Enables others to think about old problems in new ways. Communicates in a way that forces others to rethink ideas that they had never questioned before.

Courage

Willing to stand up for ideas even if they are unpopular. Does not give in to pressure or to others’ opinions in order to avoid confrontation. Will do what’s right for the company and for employees even if it causes personal hardship.

Dependability

Follows through and keeps commitments. Takes responsibility for actions and accepts responsibility for mistakes. Works well independently of the boss.

Flexibility

Functions effectively in changing environments. When a lot of issues hit at once, handles more than one problem at a time. Changes course when the situation warrants it.

Integrity

Does what is morally and ethically right. Does not abuse management privileges. Is a consistent role model.

Judgment

Reaches sound and objective evaluations of alternative courses of action through logic, analysis, and comparison. Puts facts together rationally and realistically. Uses past experience and information to bring perspective to present decisions.

Respect for others

Honors and does not belittle the opinions or work of other people, regardless of their status or position.

Source

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Reading Over Your Shoulder: Social Readers and Privacy Law

March 19, 2012

Margot Kaminski has an article in Wake Forest Law Review. Online that begins:

My friends, who are generally well educated and intelligent, read a lot of garbage. I know this because since September 2011, their taste in news about Justin Bieber, Snooki, and the Kardashians has been shared with me through “social readers” on Facebook.[1] Social readers instantaneously list what you are reading on another website, without asking for your approval before disclosing each individual article you read. They are an example of what Facebook calls “frictionless sharing,” where Facebook users ostensibly influence each other’s behavior by making their consumption of content on other websites instantly visible to their friends.[2] Many people do not think twice about using these applications, and numerous publications have made them available, including the Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, and Guardian.[3]

Footnotes

  1. See, e.g., Ian Paul, Wall Street Journal Social on Facebook: A First Look, Today @PCWorld Blog (Sep. 20, 2011, 7:02 AM), http://www.pcworld.com/article/240274/wall_street_journal_social_on_facebook
    _a_first_look.html.
  2. Jason Gilbert, Facebook Frictionless App Frenzy Will Make Your Life More Open, Huffington Post (Jan. 18, 2012), http://www.huffingtonpost.com
    /2012/01/18/facebook‑actions‑arrive‑major‑changes_n_1213183.html.
  3. See The Washington Post Social Reader, Wash. Post, http://www.washingtonpost.com/socialreader (last visited Feb. 26, 2012); Press Release, The Guardian, Guardian Announces New App on Facebook to Make News More Social (Sept, 23, 2011), available at http://www.guardian.co.uk/gnm
    -press-office/guardian-launches-facebook-app; Paul, supra note 1.
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The FBI vs the FTC: the battle for user privacy in social media

February 1, 2012

Why should you care that the FBI wants to better reap intelligence? The agency’s RFI comes swaddled in the dialect of benevolent care for national security. From the document:

Intelligence analysts will monitor social media looking for threatening responses to news of the day such as major policy announcements by the federal government, for responses to natural disasters like an earthquake or hurricane, or indicators of pending adverse events.

Yes, of course we want our intelligence agencies to have advanced intelligence when it relates to terrorism or natural disasters. But do we really want these agencies to have better ways to pinpoint us if they associate our online personas with given keywords, rightly or wrongly drawing assumptions and gathering ever-more information that can and will be used against us in a court of law?

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Google announces upcoming changes that affect your privacy

January 30, 2012

The main change is for users with Google Accounts. Their new Privacy Policy makes clear that, if you’re signed in, they may combine information you’ve provided from one service with information from other services. In short, they’ll treat you as a single user across all our products, which will mean a simpler, more intuitive Google experience.

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A Handful of 2012 Privacy & Security Predictions

January 3, 2012

A handful of thoughts on what 2012 may hold by Attorney Richard L. Santalesa:

  • The EU’s on deck Data Protection Regulation promises – or threatens depending on your viewpoint – to significantly revamp the EU’s data protection regimes, adding additional potential uncertainty to the EU arena.  The leaked DPR indicated a new broad extraterritorial reach, stronger protections for children under 18, embracing privacy by design and the right to be forgotten, a requirement to designate a privacy officer, and increased enforcement powers and penalties.  We’ll see what happens when the rubber meets the road.
  • Will the final version of the HIPAA breach notification rule make a long-awaited appearance in 2012, along with guidelines per Stage 2 of the electronic record incentive program within the HITECH Act ?  The smart money says yes, especially since Congress recently admonished DHS to hurry up already given that the “interim” rule has been around since 2009.
  • The FTC plans to issue in early 2012 its finalized Privacy Report, formally titled “Protecting Consumer Privacy in an Era of Rapid Change: A Proposed Framework for Businesses and Policymakers,” which I believe will have a significant impact on the 2012 privacy/infosec landscape.  The draft version, issued a year ago in December 2010, immediately sparked wide-ranging conversations on Do-Not-Track, Privacy by Design, Fair Information Practice Principles, Geolocation and other privacy-related issues, many of which quickly found their way into 2011’s proposed bills.  I expect the finalized report to be heavily influential on 2012’s infosec and privacy debates.
  • Information security and data protection issues surrounding contracting for cloud services will begin the road to maturity in 2012 as the federal government continues its push of fed agency IT needs into the cloud.  The result will help provide guidance on cloud contracting issues addressing audit assurances, cloud security and accreditation, e-discovery issues, security controls and allocation of liability and responsibility for data security, to name but a few.
  • Finally, 2012 will unfortunately see no end in sight to advanced attacks resulting in data breaches, with attacks on mobile devices to ramp up significantly.  In response the move to Big Data and data hoarding may reverse as companies in specific sectoral areas begin paring back on how much data they retain.

For additional 2012 infosec and privacy predictions, pop over to Christine Marciano of Cyber Data Risk Managers’ collection, which includes the author’s  views of 2012, at  http://www.dataprivacyinsurance.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/2012-DATA-PRIVACY-AND-INFORMATION-SECURITY-PREDICTIONS.pdf

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The Best And Worst Of Everything In 2011: A Mega, Meta Mashup

December 29, 2011

Enjoy!  Here’s the mother of all roundups that you will find online, offline, and everywhere else. Each line is taken from those other year-end lists.

LInk: The Best And Worst Of Everything In 2011: A Mega, Meta Mashup 

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Share your thoughts

December 23, 2011